When mind hurts Part II

 

Mind hurts?, in the previous article about mental illness, it was said that it was very difficult to diagnose mental illness.

Therefore when the mind is sick, it does not hurt; but what is clear is that mental illness is like being in the middle of a tornado.

And: what do you experience when you are a victim of the mental tornado?

It is a state in which a colorful collage of ideas, both negative and positive, are arising at the same time.

It’s like being in a boxing ring where arguments and counterarguments hit each other, unleashing an energy that leaves us exhausted.

It is as if product of all those conflicts, we did not know what to do.

One feels like in a crossfire where what he does not understand because what he does not want to do or to think.

But at the end he does it, then repentance and the feeling of guilt comes together to close the circle that is repeated again and again.

In this mental maelstrom we feel an intense discomfort with life, as if we were stuck and could not move and the disappointment with the world in which we live becomes permanent.

It is normal of course that at some point in our lives we succumb to a mental storm.

But the key question is: What to do if we are submerged in a mental whirlpool?

Well, find a safe place to take shelter to experience safety and serenity.

And, which is the location where the mind hurts?

And what is this site? In order to begin to answer this question, I can tell a story.

Confucius was sitting one day in front of a big waterfall that ended in a big whirlpool.

He was in a state of deep meditation when he observed that at the top of the waterfall an old man, much older than him, was throwing himself from the top of the waterfall into the whirlpool.

Confucius thought he had witnessed a suicide and felt sorry for that old man who at his age had tried to end his life.

But what was his surprise when he saw that the old man placidly appear  by one of the river banks.

Intrigued, Confucius approached him and said, “I see that I have been wrong to think you wanted to kill yourself, but please, get me out of doubt: How could you survive the enormous force of the whirlpool considering that even a young man could not have done?.

The old man answered: – It is not the first time that I do this kind of exercise, and the key is not to resist, to let go, because everything that is agitated like this whirlpool, has a center of calm and peace from where it comes out all the agitation.

If you do not offer resistance and you do not identify with the agitation, then inexorably you will reach the calm center and from there it is always easy to leave.

This beautiful story contains the key to also take refuge from mental illness. But that will be the subject of the next article.

 

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